jockohomoremix-deactivated20140
David Wojnarowicz Clickable Journals and a Dateline - “Artist David Wojnarowicz’s thirty or so journals are stored in a pair of boxes in New York University’s Fales Library. Folders of loose photographs, tickets, and postcards are also included, as is an oversize wall calendar, sparsely annotated by Wojnarowicz, of the type one might find in the gift shop of the American Museum of Natural History (triceratops rooting in lush surrounds). “Series 1,” as this lot of the David Wojnarowicz Collection is designated, feels like a grouping of keepsakes: These are items in and by means of which Wojnarowicz marked, from 1970 to 1991, time’s passing. In 1992, he died at the age of thirty-seven.”

*“Years Ago Before the Nation Went Bankrupt” was commissioned by Triple Canopy as part of its Internet as Material project area, supported in part by the Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Thanks to the Fales Library and Lisa Darms, PPOW, and Tom Rauffenbart

David Wojnarowicz Clickable Journals and a Dateline - “Artist David Wojnarowicz’s thirty or so journals are stored in a pair of boxes in New York University’s Fales Library. Folders of loose photographs, tickets, and postcards are also included, as is an oversize wall calendar, sparsely annotated by Wojnarowicz, of the type one might find in the gift shop of the American Museum of Natural History (triceratops rooting in lush surrounds). “Series 1,” as this lot of the David Wojnarowicz Collection is designated, feels like a grouping of keepsakes: These are items in and by means of which Wojnarowicz marked, from 1970 to 1991, time’s passing. In 1992, he died at the age of thirty-seven.”

*“Years Ago Before the Nation Went Bankrupt” was commissioned by Triple Canopy as part of its Internet as Material project area, supported in part by the Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Thanks to the Fales Library and Lisa Darms, PPOW, and Tom Rauffenbart

David WojnarowiczArthur Rimbaud in New YorkFrom a series of twenty-four gelatin-silver prints10” x 8” each1978-79
nyu.edu/greyart/exhibits/downtown%20pix/Wojnarowicz.html
"The similarities between Rimbaud’s life and Wojnarowicz’s are striking:  They lived exactly a century apart and both died in their late 30s; each  came from a broken home with abusive parents; both fled to the big  city—Rimbaud to Paris, Wojnarowicz to New York; both were gay, and each  found a surrogate father in the form of an older lover—Paul Verlaine  for Rimbaud, Peter Hujar for Wojnarowicz. In addition to his work as an  artist—which has become more widely  recognized over the  years—Wojnarowicz was a political activist in   the midst of the AIDS  crisis, the disease that would eventually take his life"

David Wojnarowicz
Arthur Rimbaud in New York
From a series of twenty-four gelatin-silver prints
10” x 8” each
1978-79

"The similarities between Rimbaud’s life and Wojnarowicz’s are striking: They lived exactly a century apart and both died in their late 30s; each came from a broken home with abusive parents; both fled to the big city—Rimbaud to Paris, Wojnarowicz to New York; both were gay, and each found a surrogate father in the form of an older lover—Paul Verlaine for Rimbaud, Peter Hujar for Wojnarowicz. In addition to his work as an artist—which has become more widely recognized over the years—Wojnarowicz was a political activist in the midst of the AIDS crisis, the disease that would eventually take his life"