newmuseum
Twenty years ago today, the New Museum was draped in black in recognition of Day Without Art—the national day of action and mourning in response to the AIDS crisis. The LED sign from “Let The Record Show…” was installed in the Museum’s Broadway window and programmed with current statistical information on the AIDS crisis by Gran Fury and ACT UP. Please join us today as we recognize Day With(out) Art with a special screening of Jim Hubbard’s United in Anger: A History of ACT UP.

Twenty years ago today, the New Museum was draped in black in recognition of Day Without Art—the national day of action and mourning in response to the AIDS crisis. The LED sign from “Let The Record Show…” was installed in the Museum’s Broadway window and programmed with current statistical information on the AIDS crisis by Gran Fury and ACT UP. Please join us today as we recognize Day With(out) Art with a special screening of Jim Hubbard’s United in Anger: A History of ACT UP.

ACT UP Returns to Wall Street With Occupy and Others on April 25

On April 25th, and in honor of its 25th anniversary, AIDS activist group ACT UP (The AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power), joined by organizations ranging from Occupy Wall Street to Visual AIDS to Housingworks as well as other AIDS activist and queer organizations, will be staging a large scale demonstration on Wall Street reminiscent of its original Wall Street protests of the late 1980s.

Planning to march from City Hall to Wall Street, ACT UP, as well as the other groups, are marching in favor of a Financial Speculation Tax (Fi.S.T.), otherwise known as the Robin Hood tax, on Wall Street, a tax on speculative trading by Wall Street investment banks, hedge funds and other large financial institutions.  The revenue generated with this tax would then be used to fund the fight against HIV/AIDS both in the United States and abroad. The organizations are also stating their hope that this tax would also help create universal healthcare in the United States.

Gran Fury: Read My LipsJanuary 31st - March 17th, 2012Gallery hours: Tue - Sat, 10:30 - 6:00
80wse80 Washington Square EastGreenwich Village, NYC
80WSE is proud to announce the opening of “Gran Fury: Read My Lips,” the first comprehensive survey documenting the important AIDS activist art collective’s work from 1987-1995. The exhibition, curated by Gran Fury and 80WSE Assistant Director Michael Cohen will run from January 31st - March 17th, 2012. The exhibition consists of 15 pieces including give-away reproductions. Gran Fury has reconstituted all but two of the works from archival documentation for this survey with the assistance of the 80WSE staff.Naming itself after the model of Plymouth automobile used by the New York City Police Department, Gran Fury made public projects that were simultaneously scathing, provocative, stylish and often quite funny. This exhibition conveys the collective’s unique voice across a wide variety of media including billboards, postcards, video, posters and painting. Photographs and records from the period help convey the urgency of the early AIDS crisis that lead many into the streets to demand reforms that changed public policy and saved lives.Gran Fury’s work raised public awareness of AIDS and put pressure on politicians, while sparking debate in sites ranging from the Illinois Senate to the tabloid press of Italy. Bridging the gap between Situationist site-specific art strategies, post-modern appropriation and the Queer activist movement, Gran Fury has been influential to later practitioners. Their work opens up a broader spectrum of understanding about the political and collective art practices that flourished in downtown New York during the Eighties and Nineties.An 88 page full-color catalogue designed by Gran Fury with mirroring double page cover reproductions will be published by 80WSE press in conjunction with the exhibition; it is the first major publication solely dedicated to their output. As a summary of its productive career, the book reprints historical interviews between Gran Fury and Robert Gober, David Deitcher and Douglas Crimp, as well as three never-before published conversations by Gran Fury from late 2010.Reproductions of all the major works are included as well as documentation of ACT UP demonstrations and shots of Gran Fury’s works installed site-specifically. In addition, images of the site-specific works’ defacement by those responding to it, and rare archival images from high points in the collective’s career such as the 1991 Venice Biennial controversy are included.
steinhardt.nyu.edu/80wse/GF_PressRelease

Gran Fury: Read My Lips
January 31st - March 17th, 2012
Gallery hours: Tue - Sat, 10:30 - 6:00

80wse
80 Washington Square East
Greenwich Village, NYC

80WSE is proud to announce the opening of “Gran Fury: Read My Lips,” the first comprehensive survey documenting the important AIDS activist art collective’s work from 1987-1995. The exhibition, curated by Gran Fury and 80WSE Assistant Director Michael Cohen will run from January 31st - March 17th, 2012. The exhibition consists of 15 pieces including give-away reproductions. Gran Fury has reconstituted all but two of the works from archival documentation for this survey with the assistance of the 80WSE staff.

Naming itself after the model of Plymouth automobile used by the New York City Police Department, Gran Fury made public projects that were simultaneously scathing, provocative, stylish and often quite funny. This exhibition conveys the collective’s unique voice across a wide variety of media including billboards, postcards, video, posters and painting. Photographs and records from the period help convey the urgency of the early AIDS crisis that lead many into the streets to demand reforms that changed public policy and saved lives.

Gran Fury’s work raised public awareness of AIDS and put pressure on politicians, while sparking debate in sites ranging from the Illinois Senate to the tabloid press of Italy. Bridging the gap between Situationist site-specific art strategies, post-modern appropriation and the Queer activist movement, Gran Fury has been influential to later practitioners. Their work opens up a broader spectrum of understanding about the political and collective art practices that flourished in downtown New York during the Eighties and Nineties.

An 88 page full-color catalogue designed by Gran Fury with mirroring double page cover reproductions will be published by 80WSE press in conjunction with the exhibition; it is the first major publication solely dedicated to their output. As a summary of its productive career, the book reprints historical interviews between Gran Fury and Robert Gober, David Deitcher and Douglas Crimp, as well as three never-before published conversations by Gran Fury from late 2010.

Reproductions of all the major works are included as well as documentation of ACT UP demonstrations and shots of Gran Fury’s works installed site-specifically. In addition, images of the site-specific works’ defacement by those responding to it, and rare archival images from high points in the collective’s career such as the 1991 Venice Biennial controversy are included.

United in Anger World Premiere at MoMA: February 16th
United in Anger: A History of ACT UP is an inspiring documentary about the birth and life of the AIDS activist movement from the perspective of the people in the trenches fighting the epidemic. Utilizing oral histories of members of ACT UP, as well as rare archival footage, the film depicts the efforts of ACT UP as it battles corporate greed, social indifference, and government neglect.
Documentary Fortnight 2012MoMA’s International Festival of Nonfiction Film and Media
Thursday, February 16, 20128:00 PM
The Titus One Theater11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY
Tickets go on sale February 9.
$12 adults. $10 seniors. $8 students. Free for MoMA members.
View the United In Anger trailer here

United in Anger World Premiere at MoMA: February 16th

United in Anger: A History of ACT UP is an inspiring documentary about the birth and life of the AIDS activist movement from the perspective of the people in the trenches fighting the epidemic. Utilizing oral histories of members of ACT UP, as well as rare archival footage, the film depicts the efforts of ACT UP as it battles corporate greed, social indifference, and government neglect.

Documentary Fortnight 2012
MoMA’s International Festival of Nonfiction Film and Media

Thursday, February 16, 2012
8:00 PM

The Titus One Theater
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY

Tickets go on sale February 9.

$12 adults. $10 seniors. $8 students. Free for MoMA members.

Keith HaringSilence = Death, 1989acrylic on canvas40 x 40 inches
"Unfortunately, death is a fact of life. I don’t think it’s happened to  me any more unfairly than to anyone else. It could always be worse. I’ve  lost a lot of people, but I haven’t lost everybody. I didn’t lose my  parents or my family. But it’s been an incredible education, facing  death, facing it the way that I’ve had to face it at this early age. I  guess it’s similar to what it must have been to go to with and to lose  your friends while you’re at war. A lot of people don’t start to lose  their friends until they’re fifty or sixty years old. But to start  having it happen when you’re in your mid-twenties - especially because a  lot of the people that I’ve lost have been lost because of AIDS - to  have it happen that way, in a way which can many times be very slow and  very horrible and very painful, you know, it’s been really hard. It’s  toughened me. It’s made me, in a way, more respectful of life and more  appreciative of life than I ever, ever could have been." - Keith Haring

Keith Haring
Silence = Death, 1989
acrylic on canvas
40 x 40 inches

"Unfortunately, death is a fact of life. I don’t think it’s happened to me any more unfairly than to anyone else. It could always be worse. I’ve lost a lot of people, but I haven’t lost everybody. I didn’t lose my parents or my family. But it’s been an incredible education, facing death, facing it the way that I’ve had to face it at this early age. I guess it’s similar to what it must have been to go to with and to lose your friends while you’re at war. A lot of people don’t start to lose their friends until they’re fifty or sixty years old. But to start having it happen when you’re in your mid-twenties - especially because a lot of the people that I’ve lost have been lost because of AIDS - to have it happen that way, in a way which can many times be very slow and very horrible and very painful, you know, it’s been really hard. It’s toughened me. It’s made me, in a way, more respectful of life and more appreciative of life than I ever, ever could have been." - Keith Haring